Scientific literature

In the past 20 years, home-use systems have been developed in order to improve oxygen therapy at home. Oxypoint introduces these technologies in hospitals and refers in this context to the most relevant discoveries in the scientific literature.

During rest, sleep or exercise an equivalent pO2 en SpO2 is found in patients while using the comfort mode.

References

1) G R Kerby, W J O’Donohue, D J Romberger, F N Hanson and G A Koenig. Clinical efficacy and cost benefit of pulse flow oxygen in hospitalized patients. Chest 1990;97;369-372

2) Stefan Langenhof and Joachim Fichter. Comparison of Two Demand Oxygen Delivery Devices for Administration of Oxygen in COPD. Chest 2005;128;2082-2087

3) R Garrod, J C Bestall, E Paul, J A Wedzicha. Evaluation of pulsed dose oxygen delivery during exercise in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thorax 1999;54:242–244

4) Antoine Cuvelier, Jean-Francois Muir, Pierre Czernichow, Emmanuel Vavasseur, Florence Portier, Daniel Benhamou and Dominique Samson-Dolfuss. Nocturnal Efficiency and Tolerance of a Demand Oxygen Delivery System in COPD Patients With Nocturnal Hypoxemia. Chest 1999; 116:22–29

5) Robert L Chatburn, Joseph S Lewarski and Robert W McCoy. Nocturnal Oxygenation Using a Pulsed-Dose Oxygen-Conserving Device Compared to Continuous Flow. Respir Care 2006;51(3):252–256.

6) James S. Bower, Charlesj Brook, Kelly Zimmer, and Daryl Davis. Performance of a Demand Oxygen Saver System during Rest, Exercise, and Sleep in Hypoxemic Patients. Chest 1988;94;77-80

7) Brian L. Tiep, Kent L. Christopher, Brın T Spofford, John R. Goodman, Patricia D. Worley and Siobhan L. Macy. Pulsed Nasal and Transtracheal Oxygen Delivery. Chest 1990;97;364-368

The comfort mode can be used for O2-therapy in hospitals:

  • Equivalent oxygenation in hospitalized patients
  • Implemented in the pneumology, cardiology, orthopedics as well as surgery

References

1) C M Roberts, J Bell, J A Wedzicha. Comparison of the efficacy of a demand oxygen delivery system with continuous low flow oxygen in subjects with stable COPD and severe oxygen desaturation on walking. Thorax 1996;51:831-834

2) Herlong H., Evaluation of a hospital oxygen conserving flowmeter. Abstract Presbyterian Intercomunity Hospital

Importance of the chosen technology:

  • The comfort modes of different brands don’t have the same quality
  • Bolus at the first inhalation stage: better results for the patients

References

1) Peter L Bliss, Robert W McCoy and Alexander B Adams. Characteristics of Demand Oxygen Delivery Systems: Maximum Output and Setting Recommendations. Respir Care 2004;49(2):160–165

2)Sheldon R. Braun, Ginger Spratt, Graham C. Scott and Mark Ellersieck. Comparison of Six Oxygen Delivery Systems for COPD Patients at Rest and during Exercise* Chest 1992;102;694-698

3)C M Roberts, J Bell, J A Wedzicha. Comparison of the efficacy of a demand oxygen delivery system with continuous low flow oxygen in subjects with stable COPD and severe oxygen desaturation on walking. Thorax 1996;51:831-834

4)Stefan Langenhof and Joachim Fichter. Comparison of Two Demand Oxygen Delivery Devices for Administration of Oxygen in COPD*. Chest 2005;128;2082-2087

5)Robert L Chatburn, Joseph S Lewarski and Robert W McCoy. Nocturnal Oxygenation Using a Pulsed-Dose Oxygen-Conserving Device Compared to Continuous Flow. Respir Care 2006;51(3):252–256.

6)Sheldon R. Braun, Ginger Spratt, Graham C. Scott and Mark Ellersieck. Comparison of Six Oxygen Delivery Systems for COPD Patients at Rest and during Exercise* Chest 1992;102;694-698

The comfort mode keeps the moisture of the mucous membranes in the nose intact during oxygenation. This eliminates dehydratation and irritation of the nasal cavity.

References

1) Floreani A, Kerhy GR, Pingleton SK, Whitman R, Shippy M. Evaluation of a demand flow 02 delivery device. Chest 1986; 89:485S

2)Kelly MG, McGarvey LP, Heaney LG, Elborn JS. Nasal septal perforation and oxygen cannulae. Hosp Med 2001;62(4):248

3)Miyamoto K, Nishimura M. Nasal dryness discomfort in individuals receiving dry oxygen via nasal cannula. Respir Care 2008;53(4):503-504

4) Chanques G, Constantin JM, Sauter M, Jung B, Sebbane M, Verzilli D, Lefrant JY, Jaber S. Discomfort associated with underhumidified high-flow oxygen therapy in critically ill patients. Intensive Care Med 2009;35(6):996-1003

5)Wu K, Ahmed A, Woolford TJ. Treatment of home oxygen induced rhinitis: an unusual use for a nasal obturator. Rhinology 20014;42(4):244-245.

Required usage of a humidifier during oxygenation is absent when using the comfort mode. This eliminates the infection risk of the humidifier.

References

1)Pendleton N, Cheesbrough JS, Walshaw MJ, Hind CR. Bacterial colonisation of humidifier attachments on oxygen concentrators prescribed for long term oxygen therapy: a district review. Thorax 1991;46(4):257-258.

2)Yamashita K, Nishiyama T, Yokoyama T, Abe H, Manabe M. A comparison of the rate of bacterial contamination for prefilled disposable and reusable oxygen humidifiers. J Crit Care 2005;20(2):172-175; discussion 175.

3)Bou R, Ramos P. Outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease caused by a contaminated oxygen humidifier. J Hosp Infect 2009;71(4):381-383.

4)Harris AA, Goodman L, Levin S. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia associated with the use of a home humidifier. The Western journal of medicine 1984;141(4):521-523.

The comfort mode only gives an O2 dose during the first inhalation stage. The comfort mode assures no waste of oxygen during exhalation or absence of the patient.  These two measures contribute to a drastic reduction of the oxygen consumption in the hospital.

References

1)G R Kerby, W J O’Donohue, D J Romberger, F N Hanson and G A Koenig. Clinical efficacy and cost benefit of pulse flow oxygen in hospitalized patients. Chest 1990;97;369-372

2) Antoine Cuvelier, Jean-Francois Muir, Pierre Czernichow, Emmanuel Vavasseur, Florence Portier, Daniel Benhamou and Dominique Samson-Dolfuss. Nocturnal Efficiency and Tolerance of a Demand Oxygen Delivery System in COPD Patients With Nocturnal Hypoxemia*. Chest 1999; 116:22–29

3) B Tiep and R Carter. Oxygen conserving devices and methodologies (review article). Chronic Respiratory Disease 2008; 5: 109–114

4) Diego Castillo, Rosa Güell, and Pere Casan. Oxygen-Conserving Systems: A Forgotten Resource (review article). Arch Bronconeumol. 2007;43(1):40-5

5) Robert McCoy. Oxygen-Conserving Techniques and Devices (review article) Respir Care 2000;45(1):95–103

6) Eric S. Yaeger, Sharolene Goodman, Eric Hoddes and Kent L. Christopher. Oxygen Therapy Using Pulse and Continuous Flow With a Transtracheal Catheter and a Nasal Cannula* Chest 1994; 106:854-60

Advantages of the comfort mode

Oxypoint strives for improved patient comfort.

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Testimonials

joris

Joris Daems,
Jessa hospital Hasselt

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Technical specifications

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About us

Oxypoint is the partner par excellence for the optimization of oxygen therapy in hospitals.

Contact

Oxypoint
info@oxypoint.eu

Philip Hendrickx
+32 (0)496 03 27 76

Dirk Borgonjon
+32 (0)486 44 51 62

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